GRANTSVILLE - MARYLAND

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

Grantsville

main

Population 600

Grantsville, began as a small Amish and Mennonite settlement, called Tomlinson's or Little Crossing. Later a new village flourished as a stop along the nearby National Road, Route 40. From 1818, the national road carried hundreds of thousands of pioneers and settlers in stagecoaches and covered wagons. In the 1800s, Little Crossing was a major stop on the old national pike. The blacksmith shop stayed open all night to fix broken horseshoes. The Casselman Inn sits in the center of town, where it has provided food and lodging to travelers since 1824.
T he community was named after Daniel Grant, settler of Baltimore who acquired In 1785 an 1100 acre tract of land called "Cornucopia."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grantsville
Amerian made vodka

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grantsville

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leo Beachy - Schoolteacher and Photographer:

http://gchsmuseum.com/shop/gift-shop/leo-beachy-photographs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

casselman inn old

History of the Casselman Inn

Built in 1824, The Casselman was one of the numerous inns along the National Trail to serve the stage coaches, covered wagons, drovers and riders that made the Old Pike the busiest thoroughfare crossing the mountains. In its over 180 years of history, the Casselman has been called Drover's Inn, Farmer's Hotel, Dorsey's Hotel, and The Casselman. Daniel Grant, an English engineer from whom Grantsville took its name, was the original owner of a tract of land that he called Cornucopia. It included much of Grantsville and one thousand acres around town. A later owner, Solomon Sterner, built The Casselman of brick that was handmade and burnt on this land. A fireplace in each room furnished heat and cooking facilities for the original building.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History of the old National Road

Now known as US Route 40, it is probably the most historic road crossing the Appalachian Mountains. Originally an Indian trail known as Nemacolin's Path, it became a military road when General Braddock marched west from Fort Cumberland in 1755 on his ill-fated expedition to Fort Duquesne. For 25 years this rough military road was the main route of travel connecting the East with the Ohio Valley.

Early in the nineteenth century the National Congress appropriated funds to rebuild the road from Cumberland, Maryland, to Wheeling, West Virginia, and thus it became our first national highway. The National Road runs right in town as Main Street and Alt. U.S. 40.

 

 

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