STRASSBURG - PENNSYLVANIA

Strassburg

Strassburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

Strasburg

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Population 2800

It was 1693 when French hunter and fur trader, Pierre Bezaillion, put down roots establishing trade with the local Delaware Indians. As the Amish populated the area in the early 1700s(?), farms were established in the surrounding countryside . Today, many Amish farmers continue to work their land in much the same way as their ancestors did centuries ago.

Strasburg developed as a linear village along the Great Conestoga Road, the main path connecting Philadelphia to the west. The Road was in use by 1714, and by 1750 a tavern and some log houses were built near the current site of Strasburg. Heavy wagon traffic and trade helped the fledgling town grow. But, with this prosperity came a certain, "rowdy" element. For a time, Strasburg was known as "Hell's Hole," a nickname that befitted the town's reckless period. By 1759, there were 32 taxable properties in the town, including about ten hotels. Many early settlers were Huguenots or Swiss or German Mennonites.

By 1815 there were 90 houses in Strasburg, about half of which were two stories, indicating a relatively well-off population. There were 53 log, 29 brick, and 4 limestone houses. About half of the log houses survive today, as well as 12 of the brick houses and all 4 of the stone houses.