LITITZ - PENNSYLVANIA

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

Lititz

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Population 9000

Lititz was founded by members of the Moravian Church in 1756, and was named after a castle (mentioned form of name is German; Czech name of this castle is Litice) in Bohemia near the village of Kunvald where the ancient Bohemian Brethren's Church had been founded in 1457. The roots of the Moravian Brethren's Church date back to the ancient Bohemian Brethren's Church.

For a century, only Moravians were permitted to live in Lititz. Until the middle of the 19th century, only members of the congregation could own houses; others were required to lease. The lease-system was abolished in 1855, just five years before the beginning of the Civil War.

Lititz is also home to Linden Hall School, the oldest all-girls boarding school in the United States. Located adjacent to the Moravian Church on 47 acres (190,000 m2) of land, Linden Hall School was founded by the Moravians in 1746, a decade before the borough was incorporated.

 

Lititz

 

 

mennonite
Old Mennonite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lititz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lititz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lititz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watching the Sunday traffic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lititz

In 1754, George Klein built a two-story stone house, which became the “PilgerHaus,” or “Pilgrim’s House.” This was the first house in Lititz. This house was built by Mr. Klein before the transfer of 511 acres of land from him to the Moravian Church. He built it without having any definite purpose in mind. This house later gave the direction to the main street of the village, and accounts for the fact that it does not run due East and West. It was used as a dwelling for ministers, sisters and congregational meetings.