GRANADA - COLORADO

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

Granada

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Population 600

Granada sits about 19 miles east of Lamar, just across the line separating Kansas and Colorado. Irrigated farming dominates the scene, but this town is most remembered as a Japanese relocation camp during World War II. Shortly after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government ordered all West-Coast Japanese-Americans to be relocated to inland camps. Known then as Amache, the camp here served as a holding center for 7,600 Japanese-Americans from 1942 until 1945.

japanese relocation camp

At one time the camp contained 30 blocks of residential barracks, each with its own mess hall, laundry and shower rooms. Children attended school while adults worked on a farm growing crops such as alfalfa and corn. Most detainees remained until the war ended.

japanese relocation camp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Granada

The Santa Fe Trail was a 19th-century transportation route through central North America that connected Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. Pioneered in 1822 by William Becknell, it served as a vital commercial and military highway until the introduction of the railroad to Santa Fe in 1880. At first an international trade route between the United States and Mexico, it was the 1846 U.S. invasion route of New Mexico during the Mexican–American War.

The route crossed Comancheria, the territory of the Comanches, who demanded compensation for granting rights-of-way. Americans routinely traded with the Comanche along the trail, sometimes finding the trade in Comancheria more profitable than that of Santa Fe.

After the U.S. acquisition of the Southwest, the trail helped open the region to U.S. economic development and settlement, playing a vital role in the expansion of the U.S. into the lands it had acquired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On July 21, 1888, a group of Master Masons met on the second floor of the frame building once situated on Lot 9, Block 16, Original Town of Granada, Bent County (Later Prowers County), Colorado, for the purpose of instituting a Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. There were thirteen brethren present.

On September 29, 1888, Granada Lodge, U. D. opened at 5 P. M. with Worshipful Master W. E. Culver of King Solomon Lodge No. 30, Las Animas, presiding in the East. The Lodge was officially constituted Granada Lodge No. 72, A.F. & A.M., and at this time the Lodge Charter dated September 18, 1888, signed by Grand Master George K. Kimball was presented.Communication dates were set as the Saturday on or before the full moon in each month and two weeks thereafter.

The Lodge moved to the second floor of the Mayfield Building, a brick structure on the corner of Main and Goff Streets, in January, 1918, where communications were held continuously until the old Bank Building was purchased and converted by the brethren.